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  • #1 by nate80 on 12 Sep 2017
  • 3D printing is addictive. I haven't had so much fun learning a new skill since being introduced to multi rotors. I found there to be a pretty steep learning curve just to get the basics down, followed still by a huge amount more to master.  But when it comes together, it's magic!

    I seem to have the Malyan M150 dialled in ok now.  Had to change out the knurled bed adjustment nuts, calibrate the extruder, change the jerk and acceleration values and re-configure the temperatures.  Also installed 3mm borosilicate glass coated with hairspray, which made a huge improvement to being able to get prints off the heated bed.

    I'm working on printing a few upgrades for the printer (ironic) at the moment.  So far I've printed a filament guide and a cooling cobra chamber.  Next up it's Z braces.  I was going to change the bearings but they work perfectly right now and don't make much noise (contrary to reviews mine seems quiet).  I've not experienced any issues with extruder gear slippage yet either and the hot end hasn't clogged, so that's a bonus.

    I'm really impressed with what can be achieved for about £250.  It's a whole lot of fun.   ::)





  • #2 by shawdreamer on 12 Sep 2017
  • just wait, you wont be able to fully visualize it yet but you'll get to a point were you've upgraded about all you can on your printer and the thought will hit you...... "hmmm I could have made my own with all these parts Ive made..... wait a dam minute!"

    and then you'll want to make your own from scratch  :laugh:

    on the bearings note.

    consider going "bearing-less", I remade the carriage on my own designed printer to run it bearingless and you wont realise just how much noise even the most high quality linear rod bearings contribute to a printers overall sound level, even the ceramic bearings Id upgraded to made more noise than the bearingless carriage does now and they were dam expensive feckers.
  • #3 by Dougal1957 on 12 Sep 2017
  • 3D printing is addictive. I haven't had so much fun learning a new skill since being introduced to multi rotors. I found there to be a pretty steep learning curve just to get the basics down, followed still by a huge amount more to master.  But when it comes together, it's magic!

    I seem to have the Malyan M150 dialled in ok now.  Had to change out the knurled bed adjustment nuts, calibrate the extruder, change the jerk and acceleration values and re-configure the temperatures.  Also installed 3mm borosilicate glass coated with hairspray, which made a huge improvement to being able to get prints off the heated bed.

    I'm working on printing a few upgrades for the printer (ironic) at the moment.  So far I've printed a filament guide and a cooling cobra chamber.  Next up it's Z braces.  I was going to change the bearings but they work perfectly right now and don't make much noise (contrary to reviews mine seems quiet).  I've not experienced any issues with extruder gear slippage yet either and the hot end hasn't clogged, so that's a bonus.

    I'm really impressed with what can be achieved for about £250.  It's a whole lot of fun.   ::)



    Now you have to design and build your own and if your up for a real challenge then build either a Delta or a CoreXY and go large

    Doug
  • #4 by shawdreamer on 12 Sep 2017
  • build either a Delta or a CoreXY and go large

    Doug

    you meanie..... your making out that Prusa's cant do "large" :cry :cry :cry

    my new design will be capable of 400x400 :tongue:

    Even now my Poltur XL will do 300x300 :tongue: :tongue:
  • #5 by nate80 on 12 Sep 2017
  • I was thinking of building one of these next:

  • #6 by shawdreamer on 12 Sep 2017
  • you might wanna consider limiting your first "build" to a printer that'll fit in a room..... rather than a room thats also a printer :laugh:
  • #7 by nate80 on 12 Sep 2017
  • you might wanna consider limiting your first "build" to a printer that'll fit in a room..... rather than a room thats also a printer :laugh:

    lol. I don't think I'll be building a new printer just yet. I'm still happily getting to grips with the Malyan. Plus, I haven't finished the new extension yet to put it in.  ;)
  • #8 by Dougal1957 on 13 Sep 2017
  • you meanie..... your making out that Prusa's cant do "large" :cry :cry :cry

    my new design will be capable of 400x400 :tongue:

    Even now my Poltur XL will do 300x300 :tongue: :tongue:

    No not at all but you do run into issues when trying to move a bed of that size the other option is to move the gantry and keep the bed static.

    Swinging that amount of mass of the Bed in say the Y axis (Which is normal for a prusa) causing a lot of induced momentum into the whole printer so you need to slow it down unless you reduce the mass considerably.

    The advantage of a CoreXY is the bed only moves in the Z Axis and drops for an increase in Z so it's mass actually helps here to keep the speeds up

    My I3 when I sold it on dis 300x200 using a FG Bed so the mass wasn't to bad but ideally you want a substantial bed for anything much bigger and that means going towards Cast Tooling plate Silicon heaters usually run of AC Mains Don't think I would want to start swinging that around  :hmm:

    But I wish you luck with it.

    This is what you call a big printer tho 

    Doug
  • #9 by Dougal1957 on 13 Sep 2017
  • I was thinking of building one of these next:

    (Attachment Link)

    That's not big see my last post
  • #10 by nate80 on 13 Sep 2017
  • That's not big see my last post

    lol.  Yeah, I saw.  Bricky's will be turning in their graves!  ;)
  • #11 by shawdreamer on 13 Sep 2017
  • My I3 when I sold it on dis 300x200 using a FG Bed so the mass wasn't to bad but ideally you want a substantial bed for anything much bigger and that means going towards Cast Tooling plate Silicon heaters usually run of AC Mains Don't think I would want to start swinging that around  :hmm:

    My Poltur XL already uses a 3mm Alu plate directly heated by a 200x300 silcone 12v pad on a regular basis, gave the 300x300 a go but It would mean the printer could no longer be enclosed which is one of the main reasons I designed the printer to be integrated directly into a lack table in the first place (along with the increased rigidity it offers) .

    with a 300x300 heatedbed it still functions perfectly fine at the same pace as a 200x200 runs its just that the current design means the edge of a 300x300 heated bed juts out at the front and rear when at its maximum and minimum movement range, mean enclosing would be a no go.


  • #12 by nate80 on 05 Oct 2017
  • I finally got the chance to finish off the mods for my Malyan M150 and did the first test print today.  It's been upgraded with Malyan M150 Z Braces (a remix of Azza's Wanhao Z Braces) and Z pillar adjustable feet. I printed additional LED brackets and installed white LED lighting, powered off the main transformer but using a standalone switch. The piped filament is now cooled using a 5050 fan and a Cobra ducting system (planning to print and test a different cooler too that Lee kindly gave me the files for), the hot end is insulated and the gear spring is tensioned with an adjustable spacer (cheers Jeremy  :beer2: ). Oh, and I printed a clip on filament feed too, which works a treat and stops the filament pulling.

    The Z axis is now super solid and I'm sure taller prints will benefit from the lack of wobble.  The LED lighting makes seeing what's being placed on the bed so much easier to see, and the cobra duct helps there too.  I wanted it all to look factory fitted as much as possible, so I wrapped the led wiring in cable spiral protector and heat shrink.  I'm very happy with the finish and looking forward to trialling some bigger prints.

    23718-0

    23720-1

    23722-2
  • #13 by nate80 on 10 Oct 2017
  • I just completed my longest print yet: 35 hours.  Some of our MultirotorUK crowd interested in 3D printers may remember my first attempt at printing a marble run design back when I first started using my Malyan M150:

    http://www.multi-rotor.co.uk/index.php?topic=21942.0

    The Malyan is a cheap printer and arrived very much in need of tweaking and dialling in.  I'm quite pleased with the way its printing now though (very pleased actually, considering the printer only cost £150) so I thought it was time to try printing the marble run again. .15mm layer height at 50mms with 25% infill printed in PLA at 195degrees and a 55 degree heated bed, and this is the result:

    23738-0

    23740-1

    23742-2

    It's not perfect and the Malyan has its limitations (plus I'm probably not competent at printing yet and still learning etc) but I'm happy with the way it's turned out.

    The printer left a few holes and a few semi-skipped lines, but mostly on the same part of the print, which was a vertical wall that the nozzle had to reach from the other side of the model to print.  Maybe I had the retraction setting too high as it seemed like there wasn't always a consistent amount of filament ready in the extruder when the nozzle finally got to that part of the model.  I'm sure if the printer had not always insisted on moving all the way from one side of the model to the other in order to print a wall no more than 10mm x 1.5mm the nozzle wouldn't have had any issues with retracted filament.  Not sure how to control that aspect of the slicing program though (Cura).

    Anyway, the model is cool and it works great.   ::)
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